Eyed Hawk Moth

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Moths, Pacific Northwest

The hind wings are reddish brown, flushed with a rosy pink hue and large bluish grey eye spots. The Eyed Hawk Moth adopts a curious resting posture, where the fore wings are held over the hind wings and the body is curled upwards. When threatened, it exposes its hind wings to reveal the large eye spots
Eyed Hawk Moth, Photo By Carol Kowal

The eyed Hawk Moth has a wingspan up to 5 cm. Adults are pale brown with pinkish brown fore wings. The fore wings are slightly scalloped with a series of chocolate blotches.

The hind wings are reddish brown, flushed with a rosy pink hue and large bluish grey eye spots.
The moth adopts a curious resting posture, where the fore wings are held over the hind wings and the body is curled upwards. When threatened, it exposes its hind wings to reveal the large eye spots

An attractive species that is found in small numbers on bogs, marshes and damp woodland, where willows are common. Adults are attracted to light but usually in very small numbers.

The larvae can be found from early June until September on willows and crab apple. They seem to prefer small, often isolated trees, usually in more sheltered spots, you can see them if you look very carefully, resting on the branches near the base of the tree.

The larvae can be found from early June until September on willows and crab apple. They seem to prefer small, often isolated trees, usually in more sheltered spots, you can see them if you look very carefully, resting on the branches near the base of the tree.
Eyed Hawk Moth Caterpillar, Photo By Bud Logan

The Eyed Owl Moth is a common moth in the Pacific Northwest but because they blend into their daytime resting spots so well, you can be considered lucky to have seen one.

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