Holberg Harbor

Previous Page  Gold River Harbor                  Next Page  Kelsey Bay Harbor

Holberg Harbor, Vancouver Island

Holberg Harbor
Holberg Harbor, Photo By Robert Logan

The Holberg Harbor had its first influx of settlers occur around 1900 as immigrants began to buy plots of land for agricultural purposes in the community and other surrounding townships. The success of these early settlements was largely hampered by the lack of good agricultural land along with bad weather and rugged topography. Attempts to develop farming communities at Cape Scott, San Josef Bay, and Sea Otter Cove proved to be dependent on overland connections to Holberg, which would serve as the primary point of entry to these communities from the south and the township of Holberg grew in population.

Holberg Harbor
Holberg Harbor, Photo By Robert Logan

At the time of initial settlement, Holberg was extremely isolated. Local travel was limited to short distances on forest footpaths. In 1896, the government built a road from Port Hardy to the south island and goods could be brought up to hardy with smaller shipping costs.  Now the flow of goods was primarily overland to Coal Harbor from Port Hardy and then by boat up the inlet to Holberg where the goods were off loaded at the Holberg Harbor.

The idyllic dream of an agricultural mecca at the northern tip of Vancouver Island never materialized. Immigrants were faced with too many obstacles from Mother Nature. Average rainfall is over 400 cm per year and winter storms frequently pound the coast with winds up to 150 km. By the late 30s, there were few families left and the land was being reclaimed by nature.

Today, Holberg harbor is a great place to set out on a west coast adventure. There are numerous trails that head out in many directions, trails to Shushartie bay, San Joseph bay and cape Scott, and the kayaking from here will give you more than you could ever ask for.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *