Cortinarius Croceus

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Cortinarius Croceus, Vancouver Island, BC
Cortinarius Croceus, Vancouver Island, BC, photo by Bud Logan

The Cortinarius group of mushrooms is a difficult group to Identify with a with any degree of certainty. There are several of them that have an orangy brown cap that looks very similar. Best to see a fruiting that has both young and old specimens. This is the Cortinarius Croceus mushroom, also known as the Saffron Webcap. Not usually a common mushroom here on Vancouver Island, although this year (2019) I have seen them in quite a few spots growing in large fruitings.

This mushroom must be considered as poisonous. It is difficult to tell some of these mushrooms apart from each other and several of them are deadly poisonous, I suggest you do not eat any Cortinarius Mushrooms. The Cortinarius mushrooms are called corts, and it’s generally pretty easy to figure out if something is a Cort, but not so easy id the species. So many look alike and with some being quite deadly, again I must say, enjoy the look, take a few pics and leave them in the ground.

Cortinarius Croceus, Vancouver Island, BC
Cortinarius Croceus, Vancouver Island, BC, photo by Bud Logan

The Saffron Webcap was first described in 1753 by a German naturalist named Jacob C. Schaeffer who give it the name Agaricus Croceus, in the early days, any mushroom that had gills was given the classification of being in the Agaricus genus, this became a very large genus as you can imagine. This genus eventually began to get divided into smaller groups. In 1821 the mycologist S.F. Frederick moved this mushroom to the genus Cortinarius where it became the Cortinarius Croceus.

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