Montaque Creek Falls

Montague Creek Falls, Vancouver Island, BC
Montague Creek Falls, Vancouver Island, BC photo by Bud Logan

Montague Creek Falls flows out of Rooney Lake before tumbling its way down to the Eve River. Along its way is a spectacular waterfall, a short hike up an old road gets you there. You access this from the lower Adams River road, walk upstream from the bridge where the creek runs under the road.

Montague Creek Falls, Vancouver Island, BC
Montague Creek Falls, Vancouver Island, BC, photo by Bud Logan

After the falls, the creek continues down until it crosses the Eve River Road. There is an awesome campsite here with room for one group, this is a real pretty site with the eve river on one side and Montague creek on the other. The fishing is good in the Eve form here and there are big fish including bull trout that can be angled here.

The steelhead society’s habitat restoration corporation has done some incredible work in both the eve river and the  Montague creek, as well as in kunnum and tlatlos creeks, all are tributaries of the Eve/Adam rivers. Much of this work was done in the side channels and small creeks where logs and other woody debris were placed. This was done to provide cover and more stable river areas that usually see less flooding damage. It’s imperative that this work continues for the health of the steelhead, salmon, and sea-run dolly varden eggs and the Juveniles who spend up to several years in the stream before heading out to sea.

Montague Creek Falls, Vancouver Island, BC
Montague Creek Falls, Vancouver Island, BC, photo by Bud Logan

Logging has been a major contributor to the lack of rearing and overwintering areas for these juveniles, many places in the system have been clear-cut to the river’s edge and this has resulted in heavy flooding, increased sediments in the spawning beds, and a decrease in good fish habitat. Logging continues to be the most serious concern for steelhead habitat protection in the Adam, Eve, and the small creeks like Montague creek. More needs to be done to improve logging techniques that will create less damage not just in these rivers, but all the rivers of Vancouver Island. We need logging, but there is no reason we can not do a better job at protecting rivers, wildlife habitats, and sensitive areas.

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