Octopus Islands Marine Park

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Parks, Pacific Northwest

Octopus Islands Marine Park, Parks, Vancouver Island, Pacific Northwest
Octopus Islands Marine Park, Photo By Robert Logan

Octopus Islands Provincial Marine Park is located along the north east coast of Quadra Island. The park is a spectacular destination for ocean kayaking enthusiasts. The park is 404 hectares of land and another 458 hectares on foreshore. The under water life here is incredible that is due to high concentration of nutrients in the cold northern waters.

From the head of the Waiatt Bay to small inlet is a 1.3 km portage that allows you to get to Small Inlet Marine Park that is accessed from Kanish Bay in Discovery Passage just north of Seymour Narrows. Both these parks are reached by water only, making them perfect for kayaking and with the portage, you can reach each of them. Boats and kayaks can be launched at Granite Bay.

 

Octopus Islands Marine Park, Parks, Pacific Northwest
Octopus Islands Marine Park, Photo By Robert Logan

There is such a variety of adventures awaiting you here, like wilderness camping, diving, whale watching, hiking,  fishing and ocean kayaking. The Octopus Islands Park is part of the BC Marine Trail where campsites, resting areas and safe havens have been created by the very boaters and kayakers who use them. This trail is being created and once all the places are connected, the trail will extend from Vancouver to Prince Rupert and down into Puget Sound. Its a great idea and one that will be well used by ocean adventure enthusiasts.

Ocean currents in these waters can be very strong, Surge Narrows can have quite a drop with incredible powerful currents and should only be traveled by kayakers and boaters during slack tide, Seymour Narrows should always be avoided by kayakers.

Mud Flat Crab, Crustaceans, Vancouver Island, Pacific Northwest
Mud Flat Crab, Photo By Forrest Logan

There is a good chance on seeing black bears, white tail deer, raccoons, mink and a variety of other small terrestrial animals and better chance of seeing marine life like killer whales, humpback whales, dolphins, sea-lions and seals. Keep your camera handy and your eyes on the lookout and you might just get that shot of a lifetime.