Turbinellus Floccosus

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Turbinellus Floccosus Mushroom, Vancouver Island, BC
Turbinellus Floccosus Mushroom, Vancouver Island, BC, photo by Bud Logan

Turbinellus floccosus is also called the shaggy, scaly, or woolly chanterelle, although it is not related to the chanterelles al all. It is a mushroom of the family Gomphaceae that is native to North America, they are quite common on Vancouver Island. It was known as Gomphus floccosus until 2011, It was then transferred from Gomphus to Turbinellus.

The orange vase-shaped fruiting bodies may reach more than 30 cm high and 30 cm wide. The lower surface is covered in wrinkles and rather than gills or teeth and is pale buff or yellowish to whitish.

They form mycorrhizal relationships with various types of conifer, growing in coniferous woodlands across North America, look for them in the fall in the pacific northwest. Some say they edible, but they generally cause gastrointestinal symptoms of nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea when consumed. I love to find this mushroom growing in our conifer forests here on the island, but as for the dinner plate, no way. Far too many people have had bad reactions and with so many other choice mushrooms here in the fall, why take a chance.

Turbinellus Floccosus Mushroom, Vancouver Island, BC
Turbinellus Floccosus Mushroom, Vancouver Island, BC, photo by Bud Logan

The fruit bodies can last for a long time, they will continue to grow for more than a month. Mushrooms in subalpine and alpine areas are typically a more sturdy version, their growth is much slower in the cold climate.

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